A Cleanse I Highly Recommend

I’m sorry (not sorry) for the clickbait, but I need to get this one off my chest and out into the world. Cleansing, detoxing, juicing…will it ever go away? Many of my nutrition related blog posts are born out of frustration and usually inspired by some ridiculous article a friend has sent me. I’ve written about how I despise Shakeology and why juice cleanses are BS and today I’m back to talk about cleansing. 

Last week, Well + Good published this piece about a guy who has given himself over a thousand colonics and claims it has saved his life. I’ll let that sink in…over a thousand colonics!

Now, he is a “colonics expert” with a private practice in NYC, where he provides colonic hydrotherapy and (surprise, suprise!) dietary recommendations.  Here are some direct quotes from the W+G piece:

Jacobs is the first to admit his oftentimes extreme wellness views aren’t based on scientific facts, but rather his own gut instincts—which is why you won’t find studies supporting the majority of his claims.

So he knows that his views and recommendations are not based on any science, but preaches it anyway. Interesting and definitely irresponsible, but that’s not even my biggest issue with this guy. He continues on:

Meat, bread, milk, chicken, fish, alcohol, drugs, sadness, anger, bad energy from too many computers and cell phones and fluorescent lights, pollution—that’s all positive ionic. What happens when a beautiful, baby-like body takes in positive ionic food and experiences emotional trauma? It goes into the body and opposites attract—it sticks like glue on you….Bad food sticks in the body

I’m sorry…WHAT?  He also doesn’t eat or drink anything at all until 4 or 5 p.m. each day. Hello, restrictive and disordered eating!

This stuff gets me fired up, so I wanted to share and counter this nonsense with the cleanse I recommend: cleansing yourself of BS “experts” and websites like these that seek to create fear surrounding food. I’m no expert on colonics, but I do know that much like how the liver detoxes for us, our colon already does the good work of elimination.  No special treatment or cleansing needed. Some argue that colonic treatments can help with symptoms like bloating or constipation, but even so, it’s temporary and certainly doesn’t address the cause of the symptoms in the first place.

 

Demonizing certain foods and instilling fear surrounding food choices doesn’t benefit anyone. When you’re wrapped up in self-improvement and aiming to live a healthier life, it can be really hard to know who to trust and what might something you should try. I challenge you to stay vigilant, ask lots of questions and start cleansing your newsfeeds and blog rolls of people who claim certain foods are “toxic”, “bad”, “dangerous” or should otherwise be avoided/restricted. 

Need help sifting through the muck? I’m here. So are lots of really intelligent and compassionate dietitians who embrace all food and focus on supporting true health. I’d be happy to work with you or recommend an RD in your area!

CrossFit Open 17.3: The Magic and a Mess Up

CrossFit Open 17.3: The Magic and a Mess Up

Aaaand I’m back with a recap of my Open workout 17.3. If you missed the first two workouts, read all about 17.1 and 17.2 first and I’ll meet ya back here for even more fitness.This latest Open workout is a little confusing at first glance, but essentially is an ascending ladder of pull-ups and a descending ladder of squat snatches with time caps that if met, “unlock” another time cap to continue the workout.  Here’s the official workout, Rx and scaled:

initial thoughts

Woof. Thumbs up for no dumbbells, at least?! This girl is still working on regular pull-ups, so chest-to-bars were out for me. Also, the Rx snatches are heavy for me. Unfortunately, the scaled version of 17.3 offered my least favorite way to scale pull-ups: jumping pull-ups. Could I have tried for that Rx score and yanked myself up there for a chest-to-bar? A few even? Probably…but y’all know my thoughts on scaling. So jumping pull-ups it was, but man I hate those.  It always feel like more of a workout for my legs than it is for my lats/arms/shoulders. 

I definitely scoffed at the 35-lb starting weight for the snatches (which I later regretted), and with my current snatch PR of 95-lb, my goal was just to get to that round. What I didn’t put together before doing this WOD was the total number of reps that had to be completed before I even got to 95-lb. Fifty four to be exact.  

the workout

3, 2, 1…I got right to work on the stupid jumping pull-ups and 35-lb snatches. The barbell by itself felt light and awkward, but by the rounds of 55-lb snatches my legs started fatiguing. I had totally underestimated this workout. 

I finished the first 6 rounds well within the 8 minute time cap and as such, earned the additional 4 minutes for the next 3 rounds (65-lb). Between reps, I tried really hard not to walk away from the barbell and just take a few deep breaths. 

The snatches were taking a toll on my quads, but also on my back. I don’t share much about it here (mostly because it doesn’t usually bother me), but I have a partially herniated disc in my lower back. The high volume of snatches wasn’t irritating that specifically, but I was definitely fatigued and my back felt tight. When I got to the round of 95-lb snatches, I took some rest, given that 95-lb is my current 1 rep max. My first attempt was a failure, but I was pulling it high enough to get under. I caught the next lift, but too far forward and I couldn’t stand up.

Here’s where the magic of CrossFit (and the Open) comes into play. After those failures, I started getting more of an audience.The coaches and other members gathered around me and wouldn’t let me give up on that barbell. The coaches and people I workout with day after day know what I am capable of and gave me the confidence to keep trying. This is one of my favorite things about CrossFit as a culture…the encouragement from people who know you can do something even when you aren’t completely sure of that yourself. And so, after a few more fails, I got one 95-lb snatch and then another.  

The snatch is still uncomfortable for me and I’ve been playing around with my hook-grip and widening my arms, so it’s a work in progress for sure. I finished with an official scaled score of 159 reps and am super happy about getting those two snatches at my previous 1 rep-max weight. If it wasn’t for the support around me, I know I would’ve just given up.

final thoughts

As I was typing this recap, I realized I screwed up and shorted myself on time for this WOD.  I finished the rounds of 75-lb snatches well under the 16-minute mark, so I should have had up to 20:00 on the clock to get through the round of 95-lb. Instead, I ended my workout at 16:00 on the clock, with no one realizing I had banked that much time. This is such a bummer because I could have taken much more time to rest between my attempts at 95-lb. Don’t get me wrong–I’m still happy with my score, but I probably could have successfully hit a few more. Dang it! I also screwed up a workout last year during the Open and it was one with jumping pull-ups. Confirmation that jumping pull-ups are not my friend!

Despite my mess up, I really enjoyed 17.3 and liked this format where you have to hit certain targets or times in order to keep going. If my back wasn’t being cranky, I may have considered redoing it but overall I’m happy with my performance! More importantly, I’m so glad the “magic” of the Open not only allowed me to hit my PR twice, but brought the fun community vibes of CrossFit back for me this week. It was definitely a welcome reminder!

Stay tuned for the last two workouts. Here’s hoping for no more dumbbells and definitely no repeats of 15.5 or 16.5!