An Apology

An Apology

I’m back! It’s been over 4 months since I last shared here and I have to say I’m so thankful for that break.  I appreciate y’all sticking with me during my blogging silence, but can’t wait to get back to sharing, ranting and creating conversation in this space.  In my time off from blogging, I’ve done a lot of growing, learning and reading. I immersed myself in ANTI-DIET culture and am now a Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor.  In the coming months, you’ll be seeing a lot more on Intuitive Eating and Health at Every Size here, but today I want to start with an apology.  I’m sorry for the things I’ve said, done and recommended when I myself was caught up in diet culture.  You see…dietitians aren’t immune to some of the influences of the media and popular culture. Our education and experience as “nutrition experts” was supposed to empower us to help others, but too often I think it functions to fuel diet rules and restrictions. 

Looking back, I cringe thinking about how many times I told people to ask for a to-go box immediately upon ordering at a restaurant, sending the message that they should ignore hunger and fullness cues and only eat half a meal.  I can’t tell you how many times I suggested someone brush their teeth right after dinner to avoid sweets or eating more. Eek. Worst of all, I would recommend clients pass up the warm bread baskets at restaurants! Do you know how delicious fresh bread (with butter) is?!

But when you know better, you do better. And now I know not only that diets don’t work but that there is another way, so I want to spread that message.  I want consumers to recognize (and truly believe) that the diets are failing them, not the other way around. I want other dietitians to be willing and open to look beyond their training and become non-diet, weight-inclusive practitioners. So here I am, spreading the word and apologizing for not getting on board sooner.

If you’ve seen the words “anti-diet”  and thought, what the heck is that?, you’re not alone. As a dietitian, it’s a given that we prescribe diets–right? WRONG.

The first (though not necessarily most important) principle of Intuitive Eating is Rejecting the Diet Mentality. For many of us, dieting has simply become a way of life and it’s tough to remember what it’s like to NOT focus on weight management or controlling our food intake in one way or another. It does seem as though the tide is shifting and people are starting to recognize that diets simply don’t work. However, diet culture is still flourishing, especially with companies maneuvering around the term “diet” and re-branding their programs as sustainable, “lifestyle changes”.

If you’ve gotten to the point of being frustrated, angry, annoyed or just plain sick of diet culture, welcome to the club! Learning to tune into your body and rediscover true health is not easy. It’s not a simple switch. But it’s possible. Here are my top 3 tips for ditching diet culture and getting started on your intuitive eating journey:

  1. Unfollow and stop supporting people who are engaging in or pushing diet culture. Their messages are what normalizes dieting and tricks you into believing you should be on a diet.  Some telltale signs to look for: before-and-after photos and posts about Whole 30/Shakeology/Macro Counting, etc. As soon as I see one of these things in my social media feeds, I hit unfollow! 
  2. Do not engage in conversations that involve negative body talk, fat phobia, food shaming, etc. You may even have become immune to these types of conversations by now, but try to start paying closer attention…The woman at work who is talking about how “fat” she feels after missing a few days at the gym, your friend you’re out to dinner with who says she is going to be “good” and only order a salad. You don’t need to “correct” these comments/statements, as the person may not be ready to hear it, but you can choose not to engage.
  3. Let go of judgement. In order to change a thought or behavior, we must first be aware of it, so noticing your tendencies to lean into diet culture or participate in the above conversations is key. Pay close attention, but be gentle with yourself–no need to judge, belittle or beat yourself up.

Ready to work on this? I’m here to help and so are lots of other anti-diet dietitians. Check out my resources page for a few of my fave fellow IE/HAES dietitian friends.

RD Real Talk Round Table

Also, if you happen to be an RD, Dietetic Intern or nutrition student who wants to learn more about the Anti-Diet Approach, don’t miss the first RD Real Talk Round Table event (affiliate link), hosted by Heather Caplan.  I’m honored to be participating, along with Christy Harrison, Anne Mauney and Robyn Nohling. You can sign up to attend a live discussion or purchase the recording and listen in later. Early Bird Pricing ends TOMORROW, so register now!

One Pot Chickpea Curry and Rice

One Pot Chickpea Curry and Rice

This simple chickpea curry dish uses just one pot and ingredients you probably already have in your pantry. 

Confession: I’ve been in something of a cooking rut lately, feeling uninspired and unmotivated to cook much at all. I’ve been eating a lot of scrambled eggs and yogurt. This is one of the reasons I love our monthly Recipe Redux challenges, because I’m forced to have a focus and get creative in the kitchen. This month’s theme coordinated nicely with the first day of Spring being on Monday. We were challenged to do some spring cleaning in the kitchen and focus on only using ingredients we already had on hand in the fridge and/or pantry.  

When it comes to using up ingredients in your pantry and minimizing food waste, the number one tip you hear is to make soup or stock, right? I like that idea in theory, but can’t honestly say I’ve ever done it. When I want to come up with a recipe to use random stuff I have in the cabinet, I turn to my old friends Google and Pinterest, searching by ingredient and modifying from there. A lot of recipe sites let you search by ingredient, which is super helpful for those times you find yourself with more canned beans than you could ever need and no idea what to do with them.  Hi, that’s totally me. I’ve got lots of garbanzo beans and as much as I love hummus, it was time to come up with something new.

the recipe

In addition to my canned bean collection, my spice cabinet is severely underutilized, so I decided to turn the spotlight on spices for this spring cleaning recipe. Naturally, thinking spices + beans led me to an Indian inspired dish. I started pulling out other staples I always have on hand: onions, carrots, broth, canned tomatoes and coconut oil. 

Coconut milk is commonly used in curries, but my fave Siggi’s whole milk skyr worked perfectly since I didn’t have any coconut milk. This recipe comes together in less than 45 minutes and uses just one pot! This makes for a super simple cleanup but more importantly, it helps all of the flavors meld together really nicely.  

This chickpea curry will be a staple in my meal prep, especially because it makes a big batch and we can enjoy it throughout the week. If you don’t want leftovers, be sure to cut the recipe in half! Read on for the full recipe, pin it for later and don’t miss the link at the bottom to get the spring cleaning recipes from other Recipe Reduxers!

One Pot Chickpea Curry and Rice
Serves 6
A vegetarian recipe for chickpea curry and rice using ingredients you likely already have in your pantry!


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Prep Time
10 min

Cook Time
25 min

Total Time
35 min

Prep Time
10 min

Cook Time
25 min

Total Time
35 min

Ingredients
  1. 2 TBSP coconut oil
  2. 2 cloves garlic, minced
  3. 2 carrots, peeled and chopped
  4. 1 onion, chopped
  5. 2 TBSP curry
  6. 1 teaspoon cumin
  7. 1/2 teaspoon cayenne
  8. 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  9. 1/2 teaspoon ginger
  10. 1 teaspoon salt
  11. 3 cups vegetable broth
  12. 1 1/2 cups canned diced tomato
  13. 1 1/2 cups quick cook brown rice (white rice works too!)
  14. 1 15oz can chickpeas, drained
  15. 1/2 cup whole Greek yogurt (I used Siggi’s)
Instructions
  1. Heat coconut oil in a large pot or pan over medium heat.
  2. Stir in garlic, onion, carrots and spices and cook for 5-8 minutes, until carrots are tender and onions are softened.
  3. Add vegetable broth, diced tomato, brown rice and chickpeas, stirring.
  4. Simmer for 10-15 minutes or until rice is cooked.
  5. Stir in Greek yogurt until creamy consistency is achieved.
  6. Serve immediately or store in the refrigerator for later (should last about a week).
KH Nutrition http://khnutrition.com/

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